Happy Halloween!

IMG_2623What a fun crafty time of year it is!  We actually finished a couple of our pumpkins ahead of time this year!  Can I tell you I got a little verklempt when E carved his pumpkin without help?  C painted a minion on a spaghetti squash which was a fun departure from the standard pumpkin fare.  When I saw recycled jars turned into luminaries at the zoo I knew we had to do that at home this year.  So super easy and fun!

IMG_2627 I thought I was done doing “room mom” stuff,  but our Science Club is having a Halloween Party and I volunteered to do the big kid craft.  We are doing paper haunted houses.  It’s really all about how much work you want to put into it so some kids will probably take a long time and others a few minutes.  I figured it would be something they could replicate at home if they enjoyed it.  I ended up making a quick pattern that I could print onto the card stock.  I was really wishing for a fancy cutting machine so we could make our own bat and tree cut outs.  You can check out the paper houses I used for inspiration.  I chose to make mine larger so they took two piece of 8.5″x11″ cardstock for the walls and another half sheet for the roof.  I didn’t make a floor to make it easier to just set them over an LED tealight.

PumpkinShootE

The boys have been taking archery lessons this semester.  Usually they shoot inside, but this week they had the chance to shoot pumpkins at a much longer distance.  I love that we are able to work things like this into our schedule!

Hope you have a very Happy Halloween!

Sharing at:

Weekly Wrap-Up WUH

Community Service Day

If you are ever want to be inspired, you should spend some time hanging out with a FIRST LEGO League (FLL) team.  I’ve written several times about how these kids do an amazing job coming up with solutions to problems.  This year the challenge is Trash Trek.  Our FLL team has spent the last few months learning about trash, recycling and ways we can Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.

TrunkChallengeMonday the kids had a day off school and decided to spend it doing community service.  Our first project of the day was to contribute to the reuse portion of the cycle by filling the trunk with clothes and shoes for the Goodwill.  I’m not sure what the donation receiver thought when five boys spilled out of my car.  She was gracious enough to give us a quick tour and we looked around the retail store for several minutes.

CollectingTrashatLakeErieDuring the course of our trash research we were shocked to read how much micro plastic is in Lake Erie.  Since we live near Cleveland, we decided to investigate ourselves.  Getting out on the lake and collecting samples of micro plastics wasn’t practical, so we decided to conduct a beach clean up.

We took a couple of clip boards with survey information by the Great Lakes Alliance, trash bags and gloves, and we headed for the beach.

IMG_2558Probably because of the time of year (mid October) the beach looked pretty clean from a distance.  We found mostly bits of plastic, bottle caps, straws, and a few plastic bottles.  By far the most common items found were cigarette tips and small bits of plastic.  We only stayed about an hour but collected 2.5 kg of trash.

BlueTrashScorpionWe thought it would be fun make art out of our litter finds.  During the summer months we would probably find more litter in the form of bottles and caps that would make better “art”, but the boys really seemed to enjoy figuring out things to construct.  A little spray paint really helped.

TrunkChallengeOverwriteThe LEGO Dragons are extending a “Trunk Challenge” to our friends, family, and readers.  Fill your trunk with donations for your favorite charity.  Donate.  Then post in the comments to let us know you took the challenge.  Issue your own challenge to your friends and family.

Sharing at:

finishing-strong-green-and-purple-200x200-      Weekly Wrap-Up WUH

Field Trip: Nina and Pinta

IMG_2511On a bright October morning, we headed to Pittsburgh to visit replicas of the Nina and Pinta.  We tend to enjoy living history exhibits and this display was no exception.IMG_2510

The Columbus Foundation sponsors these ships.  You can find their port schedules and more details about the ships at thenina.com.   We spent about an hour touring the ships and listening to crew.  The crew is all volunteer.  They are out on these ships because they enjoy sailing and history.  They are incredibly knowledgable and entertaining.

IMG_2509

A historical detail we all found interesting was that the ships of the period were coated with black pine tar including the deck.  On a sunny fall morning in Pittsburgh, we were very comfortable even though the decks were a more natural color.  We could only imagine how unbearably hot it would have been sailing these boats in the Caribbean.

IMG_2511

It was incredible to stand on the decks and imagine the decks packed with cargo and crew with livestock down below.  Today the ships sail with about 10 people total in two boats, but in Columbus’s day the crew numbered 20 – 26 per boat.

IMG_2513

Growing up in the midwest I’ve had little experience with sail boats.  Today will forever change my experience when I read about explorers on caravels.  I will have a picture in my mind, not of a vague generic sailboat, but of a hot, crowded, black deck full of people and ropes.  I always imagined that sailors felt a bit lonely against the vastness of the sea.  Today I gained a sense of how the boat could feel crowded and chaotic or perhaps warm and friendly with a sense of companionship.  IMG_2515

My thanks goes out to the people who made this experience possible – both the crew and the dreamers, who thought of the concept and carried it to reality.