Every Day Science – The Metric Kitchen

Does anyone else find the gram measurements on food labels abstract?

I truly would like to see the U.S. start using more metric units.  All scientific measurements are taken using metric units.  It is easier to make conversions between units by simply multiplying by 10 or 100 or 1000 instead of multiplying by 12 or 3 or 5280 or 16.   Not only is it easier to make conversions within length or volume,  did you know that a mL is 1cubic cm and 1 mL of water weighs 1 gram?

When we have a solid understanding of what a gram looks like, it makes food labels so much easier to understand.

With the above in mind, we’ve started taking advantage of our digital scale in the kitchen. Cooking with Scales

We started by taking the boys favorite cookie recipes and measuring the ingredients first in English units  then weighing out and recording the weight in grams.   Liquid measurements were easy because our measuring cup is marked in both mL and cups.

The next time we made cookies we used the metric measures we previously recorded.  So instead of saying, “I need a cup of sugar” we said, “I need 200 grams of sugar,”Chocolate Chip Cookie

 

This simple “experiment” :

1. Develops an understand of metric units by making concrete connections.

2. Develops a greater understanding of volume v. weight.  A cup of sugar weighs more than a cup of flour.

3. Provides a chance to practice good lab skills.

Plus,  we get to eat cookies!

 

Linking to:

HHH

 

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Every Day Science – The Metric Kitchen

  1. Pingback: Summer Learning | Learning with Boys

  2. Pingback: Weekly Wrap-Up | Learning with Boys

  3. That’s a great idea I might try with my children. Here in the UK recipes are given in grams but now we get so many recipes from the internet we use cups more and more. I often find myself googling conversions. Cups are convenient for not having to measure everything with the digital scales, for sure!

  4. Pingback: Learning Summer Vacation Style | Learning with Boys

  5. Pingback: 9 Fun Holiday Science Activities for Kids | Learning with Boys

Leave a Reply